“As if squired by last Friday’s blustery winds, a flock of 30 porcelain birds, inscribed with words and images of war and peace, settled on an Amherst College lawn, overlooking the Holyoke Range. Under the gaze of a nearby statue of Robert Frost, the birds had appeared at dawn near the college’s War Memorial.

By dusk, they were gone.” – The Daily Hampshire Gazette (click here for full article)

Christy Hengst, at Amherst College Friday, will soon take the exhibit to Peenemünde, Germany, where the V-2 rocket was developed during World War II. It's a personal journey, she says: Her grandfather was as a rocket scientist there, who "worked for Hitler, making weapons of mass destruction." Some of the birds in that exhibit will be emblazoned with photographs of the town, taken after it was bombed by the United States in 1944.

Christy Hengst, at Amherst College Friday, will soon take the exhibit to Peenemünde, Germany, where the V-2 rocket was developed during World War II. It's a personal journey, she says: Her grandfather was as a rocket scientist there, who "worked for Hitler, making weapons of mass destruction." Some of the birds in that exhibit will be emblazoned with photographs of the town, taken after it was bombed by the United States in 1944.

Hengst's birds feature war-related newspaper articles, as well as poems, love letters, recipes and poetry.

Hengst's birds feature war-related newspaper articles, as well as poems, love letters, recipes and poetry.

Christie Hengst's art installation, "Birds in the Park," has "landed" all over the world, from Germany to San Diego, Calif. It was on view Friday at Amherst College.

Christie Hengst's art installation, "Birds in the Park," has "landed" all over the world, from Germany to San Diego, Calif. It was on view Friday at Amherst College.

To create her birds, Hengst silkscreens words and images, in cobalt, onto the clay when it is flat and wet. She then forms the shapes that, she says, are meant to be "gestures of birds," rather than realistic representations.

To create her birds, Hengst silkscreens words and images, in cobalt, onto the clay when it is flat and wet. She then forms the shapes that, she says, are meant to be "gestures of birds," rather than realistic representations.